Welcome

Welcome All! I'm a dreamer, I hope you are too! A Posse ad Esse, or From possibility to reality, is a general state of mind. I hope you'll share your possibilities with me as I will with you. Namaste~

November 30, 2009

Planting fall garlic.

Garlic is one of those things that I've never really put any effort into growing. I've planted them in the spring before and got from them a few heads that were smallish and not too impressive . However, I literally only planted some 8 or 10 cloves and it was in my first year of growing so I'm not too worried that I'm garlic growing impaired or anything. Finally this fall I've put a little effort into it and I'm hopeful for next summers harvest. At the $8.49-lb that it cost to buy the other day I sure hope so!

I decided that for this first serious attempt at garlic growing on my little urban farm I'm going to try to use a part of my potato patch that last year was the least producing and at the same time hopefully I'll be able to deter some nuisance pests at the same time. The potato garden at the front of the house is essentially one large raised bed. The area at the outside edge of that bed was not easy to mound up to help the potatoes produce to their best capacity and also made it harder to irrigate. That's where I'm planting the garlic. It doesn't need to be mounded and will make a nice "stinky" border around the bed too.

I'd already "amended" this bed by turning in all the grass clippings that I had used to mound the potatoes with as well as some straw to help break the soil up. I've had good results with this in the past. To further amend the beds now, before planting, I also turned in a good helping of coffee grounds gotten from our local Starbucks "Grounds for the garden" program. They are high in nitrogen and slow to release into the soil so they should really help out next year. Here's what it looked like before turning-in and planting.After turning in the clippings and grounds, I laid out the spacing (around 5" apart) of the cloves. These were specially purchased certified seed cloves, not just garlic purchased at the grocery. Those will grow too, but may not be disease free and if they're hybridized varieties you may not know exactly what you'll get from them.If you've never planted garlic here's the quick and dirty of it. When you buy them you get a full head just like you do in the store more often than not. Just like you would break off a single clove from the head to cook with, you break the head into individual cloves to plant as well. When planting them, the pointed end points up, and the flat part (from where the cloves were all connected) goes down. The cloves get pushed in far enough that the pointed tip is about 2" under the soil.After planting, whether in spring or fall, a good 3-4 inch cover of mulch, you can see here that I used straw, is needed. This will insulate the bulbs over the winter, and will help maintain even soil moisture through the early growth and summer.

It may not be too late to plant where your located. My research tells me that after a first hard freeze but before permafrost sets in is the best time to plant the fall bulbs. I got these in just before Thanksgiving.

Wish me luck! All the best.
P~

9 comments:

Heather said...

We just planted our garlic yesterday as well. It is the first time we have tried to grow garlic, so our fingers are crossed!

ChicagoMike said...

I have been wavering on planting garlic, its so inexpensive to buy good garlic and I can get more from the garden with other crops, however, growing your own always has that allure..... hmmmmmm.......

jimspaulding said...

Good Luck!

I may be planting a little garlic myself soon as I've recently noticed a couple of my store-bought bulbs are sprouting and begging to be put in the ground. First frost has already come and gone long ago here in Taos, NM at 7000', but the ground is not frozen yet... Well, not completely frozen yet. I am ever hopeful of my garden, and will likely be found out in the snow planting away very soon, after all, I've got volunteer tat soi and dill sprouting from seed out there and my kale and chard are still holding strong.

Wish me luck too:)

Tony said...

Why do I know about your blog? Part due to the random, partly because Facebook has brought me to your blog. I found your blog very nice and why you do not use Facebook to search for or share. I think you should register a facebook account to let people find your blog great. Sign up for Facebook here . If you already have a facebook account then, please sign in to see your blog I found how. Facebook login here.
This is my blog : Blog for you

Anonymous said...

I've planted garlic cloves I bought from a garden catalog and garlic cloves I bought from the local grocery store. No difference. They both do fabulous. Now that I have the routine down I save back the biggest, healthiest cloves to plant in the fall and eat the rest. I use the square foot system and last year I planted eight feet worth of garlic. They grew so well that this year I planted 16 square feet with garlic. I love growing stuff this easy.... not like eggplant.... or watermelon.

RedStateGreen said...

I love growing garlic, it's got to be one of the easiest things to grow. I usually buy a head wherever I see any for sale (because I love to eat garlic too) and save one or two to plant.

If you know people who garden you can also trade for different varieties as well. I have Amish garlic and wild garlic, I must have at least 20 varieties.

You can never have too much garlic!

nihaty said...

Many of the necessary vitamins are found in garlic as a natural antibiotic and food should be consumed in more than gives great flavor

Dia said...

Over the years I've planted fall garlic *most* of the time - & have planted from cloves I've ordered (Seed Savers Exchange) & from local growers. & I always have a few cloves growing around the roses.
One tip I'd add; sea weed expert Ryan Drum comments that garlic does a good job of 'taking up' iodine, so if you have a source of sea weed (either from the beach, or powdered from the garden supply), that's a great addition! Mulch or sprinkle on . . .
Since both Fluorine & Chlorine block iodine absorption, (they're in the same chemical 'group' - bromine as well) this is esp. helpful if you irrigate with city water

Shannon said...

Hmmmn...looks like I'd better zip outside and mulch my garlic!!! Thanks!