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Welcome All! I'm a dreamer, I hope you are too! A Posse ad Esse, or From possibility to reality, is a general state of mind. I hope you'll share your possibilities with me as I will with you. Namaste~

July 11, 2007

Garden goings on.

I've just about caught up with the gardening chores. Weeds are pulled, plants pruned and what had ripened while I was gone has been harvested. This is the latest small harvest. The basket has raspberries and yellow pear tomatoes in it, on the right is heirloom rainbow chard, and in front is a head of buttercrunch lettuce. This is most likely the last of the lettuce I will get until fall.

I have a couple of questions for my gardening readers. While I was gone, my pea plants really made quite a showing, but unfortunatly died and dried by the time I returned. I have pulled the dead plants, and have the peas that dried on the vine. My question is this, can these vine dried peas be used for anything, or are they no good? If I can rehydrate and eat them I will, but don't know how they would taste. Any help would be appreciated. The other question is what summer crops are there that are fairly heat tolerant that I can plant for a late summer crop if any? I have a large bit of open bedding now that the peas are out, and I'd like to use it for something besides weeds. Then again, maybe I'll seed it with some of the dandylions that are popping up now for some late summer salad greens? Any suggestions?
P~

2 comments:

EPM said...

If you have heirloom peas, you can use them as the seeds to plant your peas next time. My grandmother would do it this way sometimes. You should also be able to rehydrate them, perhaps even sprout them to use as a crunchy addition to a salad!

EPM said...

Also, here's a link to our list of growing season items for the whole year. I'm not sure what your climate zone is, but perhaps this listing would help you be able to determine what you might have time to plant, or your county extension office might have a similar listing to this one that is more specific to your area.

http://www.picktnproducts.org/food/season.html